Krokbragd, Big and Small

img_2192By Robbie LaFleur

This month Melba Granlund, a member of our Scandinavian Weavers Study Group, gave a talk at another of our Weavers Guild interest groups, the New and Occasional Weavers, about krokbragd.  She asked me to bring along a piece I made, a krokbragd backed by a skinnfell.

 

The weaving incorporates traditional pattern elements from Lom and Skjåk in Norway.  For the Norwegian Textile Letter, I had translated an article from a 1985 issue of the Norwegian magazine, Husflid, and wove five pieces, experimenting with the traditional pattern bands.

You can read the article and see photos of some of the “old pattern” pieces, here.

At the New and Occasional Weavers meeting, one person expressed interest in trying out krokbragd at a fine sett. That seemed like a fine experiment, though no one had any particular guidance to give.

A few days later, for a completely different reason, I was looking through previous issues of the Norwegian Textile Letter, and ran across a photo of a small-scale krokbragd woven by Catherine Forgit, in the same pattern as my larger one.  She wove it from the pattern I had published.

cathy-old-pattern

Cathy’s version is 11″ x 16.” Shrinking down a coverlet technique traditionally used for bed coverings in the cold climate of Norway makes a piece that could even be called darling. She used a wool warp (but doesn’t remember exactly what brand of yarn), set 16 ends per inch.  The weft was Rauma billdevev yarn (tapestry yarn). She wove it on her four-shaft floor loom, and doesn’t remember having any particular difficulties. “It was fun to weave.”

Cathy lives outside of Fertile, Minnesota – way up north.  She reports, “It’s been a good winter for weaving and other fiber things – too cold to go outside!”  I hope her sheep are warm, too.

Woven Pastors in a Row – American and British

by Robbie LaFleur

In my book, weaving connections via the Web are wonderful.  A while back, a weaving instructor from the north of England, Jane Flanagan, asked for permission for her student to weave a pattern similar to one made by Nancy Ellison.  Avril Sweeting had seen Nancy’s piece featured on this blog, posted back in 2010.

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Of course Nancy was pleased that others would like to interpret her pattern.  Jane spent time with Avril working out how the motifs had been created. Avril wanted to reproduce the pattern accurately, so much so that she did it twice!

twopastors

Another of Jane’s students, Jean Roberts, saw Avril’s piece and tried her hand at boundweave too.

english-pastors

A further two students asked for help with similar boundweave pieces, so now Jane is  developing more learning materials, creating many samples, and plans to weave a larger boundweave rosepath rug early in 2017.

Thank you for sharing, Jane, Jean, and Avril. It’s fun to think about a pasture in Minnesota, with people and sheep, and some matching sheep on the English countryside.