Krokbragd, Big and Small

img_2192By Robbie LaFleur

This month Melba Granlund, a member of our Scandinavian Weavers Study Group, gave a talk at another of our Weavers Guild interest groups, the New and Occasional Weavers, about krokbragd.  She asked me to bring along a piece I made, a krokbragd backed by a skinnfell.

 

The weaving incorporates traditional pattern elements from Lom and Skjåk in Norway.  For the Norwegian Textile Letter, I had translated an article from a 1985 issue of the Norwegian magazine, Husflid, and wove five pieces, experimenting with the traditional pattern bands.

You can read the article and see photos of some of the “old pattern” pieces, here.

At the New and Occasional Weavers meeting, one person expressed interest in trying out krokbragd at a fine sett. That seemed like a fine experiment, though no one had any particular guidance to give.

A few days later, for a completely different reason, I was looking through previous issues of the Norwegian Textile Letter, and ran across a photo of a small-scale krokbragd woven by Catherine Forgit, in the same pattern as my larger one.  She wove it from the pattern I had published.

cathy-old-pattern

Cathy’s version is 11″ x 16.” Shrinking down a coverlet technique traditionally used for bed coverings in the cold climate of Norway makes a piece that could even be called darling. She used a wool warp (but doesn’t remember exactly what brand of yarn), set 16 ends per inch.  The weft was Rauma billdevev yarn (tapestry yarn). She wove it on her four-shaft floor loom, and doesn’t remember having any particular difficulties. “It was fun to weave.”

Cathy lives outside of Fertile, Minnesota – way up north.  She reports, “It’s been a good winter for weaving and other fiber things – too cold to go outside!”  I hope her sheep are warm, too.

RED – Phyllis Waggoner

“Untitled”  8’6” x 27”  Technique: 4 shaft point twill variation, treadles tied for 2/2 twill, “woven on opposites”  Materials:  5/8 linen warp, sett 6 epi, 3 ply rugwool weft.

In the case of Phyllis’ long, beautiful rug, red was part of a color challenge — could she make the red work with the other colors? She had a great deal of yarn left after completing a commission. Rather than weave a shorter red rug, she chose to use all the colors to weave a long rug.  “Necessity is the mother of invention,” and Phyllis invented a design to make use of her red, and more.

Unfortunately, the gallery configuration made it impossible to get a great head-on shot of Phyllis’s beautiful rug.  You’ll have to visit it in person, or look at it obliquely here.

FullSizeRender

 

RED – Veronna Capone

Five Studies. Each 6″ x 6.”  Linen weft, wool warp.

Five small tapestries.  The first of these five small tapestries uses traditional Norwegian ‘lynild,’ or lightning weave’; the others are in rutevev, or square weave.

veronnaFullSizeRender-4FullSizeRender-3FullSizeRender-2FullSizeRender-1

RED – Judy Larson

“Rolokan Reds.” 30″ x 29″ Cotton warp, cotton weft.  Rolokan.

Judy used a variety of red quilting cotton prints in a rolokan (Swedish tapestry) technique, spacing out the “flames” with tabby stripes.  At a distance, the sharp edges of the flame-like image is graphic and bold.  It’s worth a close look, too, where the patterns in the fabric strips look unusually dizzying.

IMG_5540

judy-details

RED – Lisa Torvik

“Transparent Tapestry #2 – Friends” 17″ x 13″ Linen and refleksgarn (reflective yarn).  Transparency Technique

This is part of a planned series of four transparent tapestries featuring a Scandinavian reflective yarn.

heart

 

RED – Lisa-Anne Bauch

Hraun. (Lava) 11.5″ x 7″  Technique: Boundweave. Materials: Cotton warp, wool weft, wood button.

lisa-bag

Inspired by lava!

Lava

lisa

RED – Claire Most

Theme and Variation. 27″ x 45″ Double-binding technique. Cotton warp and cotton fabric weft.

IMG_5276